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Righting Canada's Wrongs: Residential Schools
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Righting Canada's Wrongs: Residential Schools

The Devastating Impact on Canada's Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Findings and Calls for Action

By Melanie Florence

This book will be available 4th January 2022. We welcome you to place a pre-order.
$34.95 Hardback
Series: Righting Canada's Wrongs

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Canada’s residential school system for Indigenous children is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples. Through historical photographs, documents and first-person narratives from people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.

In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed in Canada with the aim of assimilating Indigenous people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned a report that led to residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children were taken from their families and sent to residential schools where they were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse. The schools were run by churches and funded by the federal government.

The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court.

Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has worked to document the experience. More than five years after the TRC Report was released, there have been reports of unmarked graves of children being discovered at the site of former residential schools. This updated edition includes some of those findings and examines what has and what still has to be done in regards to the TRC Report’s Calls to Action.

"If I were purchasing materials for a high school library, I would buy at least 2 copies, and I would urge Social Studies and Aboriginal Studies classroom teachers to have at least one copy on their bookselves. Perhaps the strongest work to date in the Righting Canada's Wrongs series, Residential Schools underscores the importance of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's work... Highly Recommended."

- CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"As one of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action states, 'Make age-appropriate curriculum on residential schools, Treaties, and Aboriginal peoples' historical and contemporary contributions to Canada a mandetory education requirement for kindergarten to Grade Twelve students.' (p. 7) this book certainly contributes to this action and should be added to every junior and senior high school and public library in Canada. Highly Recommended." Rated E - Excellent, enduring, everyone should see it!

- Resource Links

"A great book...there's a lot there for us all."

- CBC Metro Morning

"This resource-rich book is sure to spark both class and individual exploration. An index, glossary, and timeline will help teens navigate the rich content in this book, while links to online video and audio clips and the 'For Further Reading' section will guide them beyond its pages. Teachers will also find lesson plans and other helpful tools in an accompanying series Resource Guide."

- Jen Bailey, National Reading Campaign

Recommended by the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett for the #GiftingReconciliation Campaign

"A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."

- Times Colonist

MELANIE FLORENCE is a writer of Cree and Scottish heritage based in Toronto. She is also the author of The Missing and Jordin Tootoo: The highs and lows of the first Inuk to play in the NHL, named an Honor Book by the American Indian Library Association. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

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Publication Details:

Binding: Hardback, 128 pages
Publication Date: 4th January 2022
ISBN: 9781459416758
Format: 11in x 9in
300+ colour and b&w photographs

BIC Code: 1KBC, 3JH, 3JJ, YNH, YX, YXA, YXN
BISAC Code:  4.0.2.0.0.0.0, YAN024000, YAN025000, YAN025050, YAN038010, YAN038050, YAN051000, YAN051180, YAN052040
Imprint: Lorimer

Interest age: From 13 To 18

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